Maintenance and Construction. Fact or Benefit?

By Bob Gourley

Did your community get a new roof this year? Was your parking lot repaved? Was the pool filtration system overhauled? Were your decks replaced? Chances are pretty good that your community either underwent or will soon undergo a major construction or maintenance project. Don’t miss this opportunity to tell the story of your project or you may just be leaving money on the table!

I am often asked about the difference between a fact and a benefit as it pertains to preparing a community newsletter. As a former sales and marketing guy, you can bet I know the difference between a fact and a benefit. In construction and maintenance issues, the facts often describe the tangible details of the project such as the cost, the materials used, the contractor chosen to perform the work, how long the project will take and things of that nature. While those items are newsworthy, they won’t help you win over critics or skeptics. For that task, you will need benefits.

Benefits, quite simply, will help you tell your maintenance and construction story in such a way as to show your residents what is in it for them. Benefits are far less tangible but far more effective in explaining the need for a project and the reason to spend the association’s money. If you think about the last major purchase you made, you will most likely remember that why you bought the item is more important than what you paid for it or what you even bought. The same mentality applies to maintenance and construction projects. Here are a few examples:

Item – New Roof Installed
Fact – Shingles carry a 30 year warranty
Benefit – Interior of home stays drier

Item – Blacktop Sealing
Fact – Creates a waterproof barrier
Benefit – Underlying pavement lasts longer

Item – New Pool Filtration
Fact – More fuel efficient
Benefit – Saves money

Item – New Decks Installed
Fact – Made of Artificial Material
Benefit – Lasts longer, looks better

In many instances, money spent on today’s maintenance and construction project benefits all members of an association with lower costs in the future. Any time you maintain, protect, or enhance common elements of your association, you should do so for the benefit of your members. People want to “know” the facts but they “buy” the benefits. Use the power of benefits to keep your residents happy and informed about all of your construction and maintenance projects. You won’t just build a better property. You’ll build a better community!

Keeping It Legal – The Story of Your Community Association’s Attorney

By Bob Gourley

Comedian Milton Berle is quoted as saying “Attorneys practice law because it gives them a grand and glorious feeling. You give them a grand and they feel glorious”.

While attorneys may be on the receiving end of many jokes, the contribution they make to your community is no laughing matter. Depending on the size of your association and the challenges you are facing, chances are you have one or more attorneys performing crucial work on behalf of your association. Telling the story of the important work these professionals perform on behalf of your association is crucial to helping your community cope and thrive in the face of legal challenges.

Attorneys that specialize in the legal issues and challenges facing community associations are relatively abundant. The attorney you have chosen to represent your community is an important member of your team and a vital asset to promoting a healthy and harmonious community for your residents to enjoy. If you’ve ever taken the time to read through your community’s covenant, declaration, by-laws, and rule and regulations documentation, you have a first-hand appreciation of how complex those documents can be. In the litigious society in which we live, can you imagine having to stand by your own interpretation of those documents in a court of law?

Since 1993, Community Associations Institute has recognized excellence in the practice of Community Association Law. That is when the College of Community Association Lawyers, more commonly known as CCAL, was founded. Membership in CCAL is quite exclusive. Of the thousands of attorneys that practice community association law, less than 150 have been granted membership.You can learn more about the College of Community Association Lawyers at the CAI website – http://www.caionline.org/career/designations/ccal/Pages/default.aspx

What will your typical homeowner want to know about the attorney you have chosen to do the important legal work of the Board? Ideally, you will want to provide a biography from the attorney that details his or her involvement in the world of community association law. Many of these attorneys will be happy to provide articles of legal interest that can be included in your newsletters or posted on your website. Quite often, it is beneficial to have the attorney appear before the membership at an HOA meeting to address legal concerns held by members of the association.

In describing lawyers, John Quincy Adams said “Whoever tells the best story wins”. I couldn’t agree more. Choose your community association attorney wisely if you want to be the winner when your community’s story is told.