Communications and Community Governance

By Bob Gourley

“That government is best which governs least” – Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and dubbed “Father of the American Revolution” by historians. He was born in 1737 and lived a remarkable life that spanned the American Revolution, the French Revolution, and life in France under Napoleon’s rule. His communication skills were legendary and he largely influenced many Americans to take up the cause that became the American Revolution. So important were his writings, we still talk about him today.

Community Association Volunteer Leaders (CAVLs as they are designated by CAI) would do well to heed the words of Thomas Paine. In too many community associations, the cry for revolution can be heard. Has your community ever faced a massive turnover or group resignation from its Board of Directors? Does your Board of Directors govern too little or too much?

Community Association Volunteer Leaders are the lifeblood of community association governance. They serve on the Board, they serve on the Committees, and they participate in their communities. But as volunteers, they are not necessarily skilled in politics or communications which can lead to big problems in communities.

Thomas Paine went on to say: “Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one.”

In his day, Paine had the power of the printing press on his side. None of today’s communication marvels were available to him. Can you imagine how many friends he would have on his Facebook page or how many Twitter fans would be following him? Facetiousness aside, it is fair to say that most Community Association Volunteer Leaders can communicate far better with their community members today than Thomas Paine could back in his day. Is your association using its communication tools to govern best? Have you created a government that is a necessary evil or have you created an intolerable one? In other words, is your community a better place for your leadership?

I have long held that a community that sheds as much light as possible on its governance is a community that is far more likely to thrive than one that operates in secrecy. Lack of transparency in how their association is being run is the chief complaint I hear from disgruntled residents of associations from around the country. Communities that fail to communicate fail to create harmonious, prosperous living conditions for their residents. The lack of effective communications has made the very people that elected them to see their leaders as an intolerable evil. The irony is that in most cases, those who are governing the association are doing their level best to serve their members.

I hope you will take the words of Thomas Paine to heart when you consider how you will govern your community. The promise of America was little more than a dream when he was a young man. He understood that the challenges facing the fledgling country around him would be met by men and women of great conviction and virtue. He was a master at rallying support for his ideas and building a consensus upon which to proceed. He wrote “the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph” in describing what lie ahead for the Colonies as they prepared to declare their independence from England. While governing our associations may not be as great a challenge, we can certainly draw inspiration from his heroic words. Combine your communication skills with well-intentioned community governance and create a successful community.

Producing an Effective Community Newsletter

By Bob Gourley

I fielded a question recently about the effectiveness of community newsletters. It came from a property manager who claimed he spent many hours every month preparing a newsletter for his community that “no one ever reads”. After reviewing the newsletter, which was little more than a collection of rants about trash, dog waste, and parking violations, I agreed with his summation of the newsletter’s effectiveness. I certainly wouldn’t read this newsletter or look forward to the next issue. He asked what he could do to improve his ability to communicate with association members in future issues. Here is a checklist we developed to help steer him toward producing an effective newsletter.

The Refrigerator Magnet Test
I use a phrase to describe the appeal a community newsletter should carry. When a child brings home a great grade on a spelling or math test, it usually gets stuck on the refrigerator door with a kitchen magnet. A great community newsletter should have the same appeal. It should look good enough to be worthy of the honor and the content should be relevant enough that a community member should want to keep it close at hand.

The Golden Rule
First, and foremost, remember the Golden Rule of Community Communications – “Speak Unto Others as You Would Like to be Spoken to Yourself”. If you are going to use your newsletter to simply admonish and threaten those who violate the rules, you can expect a highly ineffective result. Every community has rules broken from time to time. The rule breakers usually represent a very small portion of the community. Why not celebrate the actions of those that follow the rules and thank them for being such good citizens? A pat on the back feels better and is more enjoyable to read about.

Positive versus Negative
Think about some of the great communicators of our time. They know that a positive message is better received than a negative message. Use positive energy throughout your publication and you will end up with a newsletter that is both highly read and enjoyed by the community. Use negative energy and you will end up with a largely unread newsletter that does little more than waste resources both in its production and its effectiveness.

Content is King
If you want to draw readers in to your newsletter, you must provide something that they want. My experience with communities has taught me that its members want to know what is going on, especially those items that effect their pocketbook. If the Board of Directors is discussing plans for a major capital improvement project, association members want to know how the improvement will benefit them and how much it will cost. Nothing draws readers in like learning about the new swimming pool they will be enjoying in one year’s time or the new parking lot pavement project that will get rid of the potholes they drive through every day. The more interesting your content is, the more your readers will look forward to learning more in the next issue.

Human Interest
Facts and figures aside, community members like to feel as though they are part of something more than a housing system. Don’t be afraid to add some human interest by sharing knowledge that will intrigue your readers. Who is new in the community? Who just celebrated their 50th anniversary? Who has a new baby in their home? These news items may seem a little trivial at first but they can become a very interesting topic to community members who are more social in nature.

Looks are Important
Making your newsletter look its best is critical to making it effective. If it looks like the person preparing the newsletter doesn’t care about how it looks, it is likely to be received in the same manner. Spelling, grammar, and design are all elements that require attention. If your community can afford color printing for its newsletter, it will carry a higher value by your audience.

Creating an effective newsletter requires attention to detail and knowledge of how to create a winning publication. If your publication highlights only negative items about the community and does nothing more than provide a platform to admonish readers about rules violations, don’t be surprised if no one ever reads it. If you take the time and effort to create a positive experience for your reader, you will be rewarded with an effective tool for communicating with your community members and they will actually look forward to each new issue.

Outsourcing your Homeowner’s Association Operations, and Why It Makes Sense

Whether your community is large or small, successful management by the homeowner’s association is crucial to a smoothly running residential community and growing property values. And the governing board is often left with a long list of responsibilities for members that already lead busy lives outside of their community. Regardless of the number of board members in your HOA, there’s almost always an endless “to do” list.

From taxes and assessments to repairs and beautification, an HOA member’s job involves many different types of property management duties. A significant aspect of these responsibilities includes the duties that fall under the operating budget. These are the regular tasks that are part of the property’s ongoing maintenance such as landscape management, building exterior repairs, and property taxes.

Seeking Assistance with HOA Operational Duties

A handful of the duties that you may handle as a board member of your HOA could include collecting dues from community residents, arranging for landscaping and repairs, fielding questions and complaints from homeowners, and determining how dues are allocated. Not all your board members may have experience dealing with these issues, and sometimes there can be too many tasks to be managed by the board.

A new trend emerging with HOA boards is the process of seeking assistance with these ongoing, time consuming operational duties. By outsourcing some of the regular tasks that face the board, while still retaining key management duties, the HOA can focus their attention on long term strategy and decisions for the property that require more planning and discussion, or anything that will affect the reserve budget.

What Duties Are HOAs Outsourcing?

As a board member, you may have never thought of outsourcing the operational duties of your HOA, but it’s becoming more common than you think. HOAs are finding that by off-loading some of the more mundane or regular tasks, they can focus more on the relationships with residents and carefully making the long-term decisions for the community. So, what tasks exactly are HOAs outsourcing to third parties?

HOA Dues Portal – Reputable companies that manage HOA duties offer secure portals for homeowners to pay their HOA dues, which can be directly deposited into an association’s account. It can automate a, sometimes archaic, process and offer a bit more convenience for homeowners.

24×7 Maintenance Support – One of the more frustrating responsibilities of an HOA board member includes late night phone calls from homeowners with maintenance emergencies. Some third parties offer call center support 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to field those emergencies, to help over phone, and to engage your local contractors or maintenance personnel to make any needed repairs.

Homeowners Portal for Community Discussions – For non-emergencies, homeowners are always looking for a place to voice their concerns, or continue a discussion from a recent board meeting. Some third parties are assisting HOAs in setting up online portals for homeowners to engage in discussion and potentially self-resolve some issues outside of board meetings.

Running a Successful HOA with Outsourcing Support

Property helpers like Hands On Tap can offer the kind of expertise and support that most HOAs never get the opportunity to benefit from. Leaving many of your regular HOA duties to a team of professionals with longstanding careers in property management results in less stress on your board, well cared for homeowners, and more time to focus on the future of your community.

Failure to Communicate Can Lead to a Manager’s Failure

By Bob Gourley

Since I work closely with management professionals, one of the more difficult questions I routinely face from community association leaders is how the community should go about the process of selecting a new community association manager. It causes me great concern when I first hear that a community is thinking of changing managers as most of them I know are conscientious and hard-working individuals who truly give their all for their clients. My first reaction is to ask the board members why they are even considering changing managers. Among the more common answers I hear are:

Too many residents complain of the manager not getting back to them after an issue is reported

 

Projects aren’t getting done on time

 

This manager is charging us too much for the service provided

 

It just isn’t working out.

 

The follow-up comment I usually get is to “please do not tell the manager” that we are looking to replace him. While I understand this sentiment, the secrecy between board and community association manager highlights the much larger problem to me. Quite simply, there has been a failure of communication between all parties involved. Unfortunately, it is often the association manager who becomes the scapegoat for this communication failure and will lose not only a client but also valuable income for years to come. That is why it is in every association manager’s best interest to be proactive in his managed communities’ communication efforts. A well-informed client is a happy client.

Communicating with board members is simple enough. Association managers already attend numerous board meetings, annual meetings and even committee meetings. However, with the exception of those homeowners who attend the annual meeting, most residents are largely unaware of the professional who manages their association. Worse still is that the only communication some residents ever receive from their association manager is a notice of a rules violation or a fine. That is why communication tools such as letters, e-mails, newsletters, community websites and even social media are vital to helping association managers properly communicate with the vast numbers of residents whose communities they manage.

Of course, there are numerous other advantages to establishing and maintaining great communications within the communities you manage. Better informed residents tend to be better behaved residents. You can use your communication efforts to build civic pride and create a better sense of community. Perhaps, most importantly, successful communication efforts create loyal clients. Wouldn’t you rather have the board come to you to discuss management shortcomings such as those listed above instead of going out shopping for a new manager behind your back? Of course, you would!

Taking the time to produce great communications is not always at the top of a busy manager’s “To Do” list. Understandably, there are numerous distractions and emergent matters to deal with. However, if you neglect a community’s communication needs, don’t be surprised to learn your clients have been secretly looking to replace you. You can avoid that disappointment by making communications a top priority. If you need help telling your story, don’t be afraid to seek out an expert. Communicating with your clients is the best way to assure they will stay loyal to you for years to come.

Bob Gourley is founder of MyEZCondo, a communications firm that produces newsletter and website content material for condominiums and homeowner associations throughout the USA. He also serves as board president of his local HOA.

As originally appeared in CondoManagement Magazine

Condominium Newsletters from MyEZCondo Keep Condominium Unit Owners Informed and Involved in Their Communities

By Bob Gourley

Frequent and open communications are often indications that a condominium association is being run by leaders who strive to create a connection between the Board of Directors, the Property Management Company, and the condominium unit owners who reside in the condominium association. These leaders are not just building properties. They are building strong, well-connected, and vibrant communities. They have learned the secret power of the condominium newsletter to be more than a throw-away piece of paper with warnings and fines and violation notices. They have embraced the power of the condominium newsletter to unite their communities and foster a bond that encourages neighborly behavior and can even call volunteers to action from projects as simple as a Spring Planting Day to as important to finding new community members to serve on the Board of Directors.

Why is it important to provide information and connectivity to condominium unit owners? Quite simply, the stronger the bond between condominium residents to their community and to each other, the more likely they are to behave in ways that are positive for themselves and the community. A positive and vibrant community carries other benefits as well, including increased property values and a strong sense of civic duty and awareness. When condominium unit owners take pride in their community, they are much more likely to report problems, suspicious activity, and other problems that might otherwise go unnoticed.

Printed condominium newsletters are a simple solution. However, more and more condominium associations are embracing technology such as email and websites to distribute their materials. Whichever method of newsletter distribution you choose the challenge of creating a top-notch, good-looking newsletter remains. That’s where MyEZCondo comes in. Our talented writing and graphic design team members will work hard to make your condominium newsletter look fantastic. It takes a fantastic-looking newsletter to get your readers’ attention. A MyEZCondo condominium newsletter will be well-read and well-received by your condominium association members. Since 2004, we’ve been “building better communities through better communication”. Contact us today and we’ll produce a great-looking newsletter for your condominium association.

Condominium Newsletters are Useful and Necessary Communication Tools

By Bob Gourley

Condominium newsletters are useful and necessary communication tools for condominiums everywhere. Condominium unit owners require they be kept informed and aware. With a great condominium newsletter, a condominium association Board of Directors will spend more time governing and less time explaining.

Creating a good-looking and effective condominium newsletter is no simple task and should not be left to a condominium association volunteer. In addition to writing, editing, and graphic design skills, a successful newsletter editor must be adept at ferreting out the important news of the condominium and then have the time to compile that news into an effective newsletter. In my many years of producing condominium newsletters, I have seen some beautifully produced newsletters produced by volunteers. However, the beauty of that newsletter fades quickly when the volunteer leaves the community or decides that the time required to produce the newsletter is not worth the reward.

MyEZCondo is the correct choice for expert production of your condominium association’s newsletter. Our skilled writing staff and talented graphic designers work together to produce great-looking condominium association newsletters for condominium association all across the country. Contact us today to see how much better we can make your condominium newsletter.